Marbled Postcards

13 Comments

Marbling on gelli plates! I am totally loving this process! I may even do some more later today! But for now – let me show you what I made yesterday.

I began by bringing out this gelli plate. So, am I supposed to called these gelli plates like I always do? Or are they gel plates made by Gelli? hmmmm. I’m thinking the latter but old habits are hard to break. So. I began by bringing out this gelli plate. A little larger than what I used in my Report & Art Book yesterday.

This 5″ x 7″ size is perfect to go with the cold pressed watercolor postcards from Hahnemühle and I still had two of those so I grabbed them. See those cute little tubes of acrylic Amsterdam paint? Joggles.com is currently giving one of those away with every $15 spent – it’s their 16th birthday and Barb hooked me up good with these yummy colors! Throw in my 2″ wide brayer that I forgot to get in the picture and I was all ready to make yummy art!

I wanted to try all the colors Barb sent me, so I picked out three for this postcard and squeezed out a small dot of each color.

Using my small brayer, I made short tap and rolls with the color. Tap the brayer down into the color and roll about 1″ spreads of color. You can see in this picture how I just rolled here and there and grabbed whatever color I happened to be near. Being careful not to really mix the colors together.

And once I got to this point I stopped. You can still clearly see all three separate colors and the plate is covered with a thin layer of paint.

I took one postcard and placed it right down into the middle of the color and smoothed it down with my hand. Sometimes I use the brayer to roll back and forth over the back, this time I just used my hand.

And lifted. The color is kind of weird looking here because of the lighting in my room at the time.

Here is what it really looks like this morning when I put it in my scanner. The lines you see are from the brayer. Because I didn’t want to smooth out all the color and blend it into one – I have roller lines. I love the texture they make and think they add to the marbled beauty in this postcard. And if I had rolled this on the backside with the brayer instead of using my hand – I wouldn’t have had those white places. But I like the grunge they bring to the piece so I am ok with it this way.

I had a second postcard and I wanted to try that gold color, so here you go. Notice there are still bits of color from the first postcard on the plate. I just leave them there and sometimes they will get grabbed up in a future print and look marvelous.

Tap and short rolls to get some coverage but not mixing of color. I love how the pink at the top left looks like a hand. Hahahaha!

This is the plate when I finished the brayer work. See that long streak from top to bottom towards the right side? That is from the edge of the brayer.

You can see that streak at the right hand side here. And on the left at the top – see those green lines? Those are from previous paint that I left on the plate. And along the bottom, too. I just really like when I get that in my prints. Character. And poor lighting for this photograph.

Here is what this postcard really looks like. I love it! So much fun doing these! I may actually go back and add some collage work to this one. Still deciding.

The only color I hadn’t tried yet was the dark blue one. Also known as Greenish Blue – highly technical name Amsterdam gave it. I grabbed a piece of 5″ x 7″ printmaking paper to be ready.

Here is my color marbled out. Just two colors. I wondered if they would turn to purple. They did not because I was able to mostly keep them separate in the marbling technique.

Print pulled. I got some green from previous pulls. And a little yellow or gold towards the top left. Cool.

And when I scanned it this morning. I am going to need to use a white gel pen when I tangle this one. I do love all the texture and bits and pops of color here and there!

The Amsterdam colors I used are: permanent red violet light, azo yellow medium, light gold, brilliant green and greenish blue. Courtesy of Joggles. Thanks, Barb! And happy 16th birthday!

I am cleaning out drawers – again – trying to make room to store some new product I purchased from Joggles and came across this. It’s been quite awhile since I was tangling to make a coloring book. Hahaha! Fun times! These were fun pieces to make. I may need to do some more. In my spare time. Hahahahahahah! Now, let me leave you with some links.

2″ brayer
5″ x 7″ Gel Plate
Watercolor Postcards and other Hahnemühle products with purchase links
Joggles

13 thoughts on “Marbled Postcards

  1. These turned out so pretty! Can’t wait to see what you create on them!

  2. More beauties! At least the technical name ‘Greenish Blue’ gives you an idea of the color. So many of the are like Popsicle Tongue or something that leaves you guessing, lol!

  3. wow, what a gorgeous post. I think I need to try those watercolor postcards! I’m not sure what I love more, the rounded edges or the tin. Perfect size and shape for gel plate shenanigans… which of course you rocked! That last one with the purple in it is my fave.

  4. The little creature with the beak made me smile. Yes I can imagine you doing collage with that particular piece & white tangling on the last one, black tangling on the first perhaps??

    • absolutely on those colors! in my spare time – hahaha! those little critters were my favorite part of the book we made!

  5. These look great. I love that little hand! I’m a fan of spotting things in random patterns, and am slowly building up the confidence to make them a feature of my tangled pieces.

    I used some of the Hahnemühle postcards today – and despite feeling thinner than other brands I’ve used they took a lot of water just fine!

    • that’s good to know – that you are using them. they really can take a lot of wetness and hold up just fine

  6. I really like the pink and yellow before any other color added, reminds me of pansies!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.